Events

  • Games4NLP: Games and Gamification for Natural Language Processing

    7 May 2018, Phoenix Seagaia Resort, Miyazaki (Japan)

    Workshop description

    It is our pleasure to announce the Games and Gamification for NLP (Games4NLP) workshop hosted at the 11th edition of the Language Resources and Evaluation Conference (LREC), 7-12 May 2018, Miyazaki (Japan).

    The Games4NLP workshop aims to promote and explore the possibilities for research and practical applications of using games and gamification for the creation of language resources for Natural Language Processing. The main objective is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to discuss and share ideas regarding how the NLP research community can benefit from using game and gamification strategies.

    The potential topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

    • Games for collecting data useful for NLP (games in planning, under development, or deployed);
    • Games for under-resourced languages such as many Asian languages;
    • Analysis of game data from established games;
    • Gamification of NLP tasks (techniques, best practice and evaluation of gamification strategies);
    • Player motivation and experience (strategies for recruitment/retention and player profiling);
    • Game design (conceptual design elements and reports of success and/or failure of designs);
    • Processing NLP game data (aggregation methods and strategies for minimising noise and cheating);
    • Use of NLP game data (how game-generated data has been used for NLP applications);
    • Evaluation of games for NLP (metrics for evaluating game performance, evaluating player performance, motivation and bias, and evaluating task difficulty);
    • Directive strategies that attempt to use game metrics in real-time.

    The workshop will be an interactive and dynamic full-day event that will be a mix of keynotes, paper and demo presentations as well as discussion sessions. The workshop will be held on Monday 7 May 2018 in the Phoenix Seagaia Resort, Miyazaki (Japan).

    Program (0900-1300 7 May 2018)

    09:00-09:10 Introduction by Workshop Chair

    09.10-10.30 Session 1 (Chair: Karën Fort)
    Invited talk: Did you also spend the last weekend playing your NLP game? (Ivan Habernal) Slides
    Faseeh: A Serious Game for Arabic Syn-onym Acquisition (Hend Al-Khalifa, Hadil Faisal and Rawan N. Al-Matham)
    Testing TileAttack with Three Key Audiences (Chris Madge, Massimo Poesio, Udo Kruschwitz and Jon Chamberlain)

    10:30-10.50 Coffee break

    10.50-11.50 Session 2 (Chair: Jon Chamberlain)
    LieCatcher: Game Framework for Collecting Human Judgments of Deceptive Speech (Sarah Ita Levitan, James Shin, Ivy Chen and Julia Hirschberg) Slides
    Cheap, fast and good! Voting Games with a Purpose (Karën Fort, Mathieu Lafourcade and Nathalie Le Brun) Slides
    The JeuxDeMots Project is 10 Years Old: what Assessments? (Alain Joubert, Mathieu Lafourcade and Nathalie Le Brun) Slides

    12.30-12.50 Project Updates
    enetCollect COST Action (Verena Lyding and Lionel Nicolas) Slides
    Lingo Boingo (Christopher Cieri) Slides

    12.50-13.00 Concluding Remarks by Workshop Chair

    Workshop Proceedings

    Invited talk: Did you also spend the last weekend playing your NLP game? (Dr Ivan Habernal)

    Serious games for NLP are believed to be a win-win situation: people enjoy playing a game and NLP researchers get their annotated data for free. But how come that only few of them succeed and hit their target audience even though they are elaborated and well-designed? In this talk, I will first review the landscape of current games for NLP and will present our attempt for a game from the perspective of the shoemaker's children who go barefoot. However, I will try to show that "pivoting" the product, starting asking the right questions, and leveraging human natural abilities might be a game changer! What if the answers are already out there but not yet in our Games4NLP community?

    Dr Ivan Habernal is a postdoctoral researcher at UKP, Technische Universität Darmstadt. His main research interests are computational argumentation and argument mining, as well as Web corpora, serious games, and sentiment analysis. He has published numerous papers at major NLP venues (ACL, EMNLP, NAACL, LREC, Computational Lingustics) and recently co-chaired the 4th Workshop on Argument Mining co-located with EMNLP'17 in Copenhagen. Currently, he is the main organizer of the SemEval 2018 Task: The Argument Reasoning Comprehension Task, co-located with NAACL'18.

    Enquiries

    For all enquiries, please contact games4nlp@dali-ambiguity.eu

    People

    Co-chairs:

    • Jon Chamberlain (University of Essex, UK)
    • Udo Kruschwitz (University of Essex, UK)
    • Karën Fort (Université Paris-Sorbonne, France)
    • Chris Cieri (Linguistic Data Consortium, University of Pennsylvania, US)

    Program committee:

    • Richard Bartle (University of Essex, UK)
    • Johan Bos (University of Groningen, Netherlands)
    • Eric de la Clergerie (INRIA, France)
    • James Fiumara (Linguistic Data Consortium, University of Pennsylvania, US)
    • Bruno Guillaume (Inria Nancy Grand Est, France)
    • Ivan Habernal (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
    • Frank Hopfgartner (University of Glasgow, UK)
    • Michael Meder (TU Berlin, Germany)
    • Mathieu Lafourcade (LIRMM, France)
    • Verena Lyding (EURAC, Italy)
    • Lionel Nicolas (EURAC, Italy)
    • Massimo Poesio (Queen Mary University, UK)
    • Pontus Stenetorp (University College London, UK)

    Previous Events

    Games4NLP'17
    Games4NLP held an independent symposium co-located with the 15th European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (EACL) Conference in April 2017 in Valencia, Spain.

  • Games4NLP: Using Games and Gamification for Natural Language Processing

    Symposium description

    Games4NLP is an independent symposium co-located with the 15th European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (EACL) Conference that will take place on April 3-7, 2017 in Valencia, Spain.

    The Games4NLP symposium aims to promote and explore the possibilities for research and practical applications of using games and gamification for Natural Language Processing (NLP). The main objective is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners to discuss and share ideas regarding how the NLP research community can benefit from using game/gamification strategies. For example, games can be used to collect large numbers of annotations of human language provided that there are sufficient numbers of players who are motivated to play, and these annotations, when aggregated, can be used as labels that replace or compliment the effort of expert annotators. The symposium welcomes the participation of both academics and industry practitioners interested in the use of games and gamification for NLP.

    This symposium is aimed at researchers interested in using games and gamification to collect language data and to connect a community who are already developing and maintaining such games.

    Attendance to the workshop if free; however, all attendees must register using the Eventbrite page. Registration to EACL is not required.

    The potential topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

    • Games for collecting data useful for NLP (games in planning, under development, or deployed);
    • Presentation and/or analysis of game data from established games;
    • Gamification of NLP tasks (Techniques, best practice and evaluation of gamification strategies);
    • Player motivation (Strategies for recruitment and retention of players and player profiling);
    • Game design (Conceptual design elements and reports of success and/or failure of designs);
    • Processing NLP game data (Aggregation methods and strategies for minimising noise and cheating);
    • Use of NLP game data (How game-generated data has been used for NLP applications);
    • Evaluation of games for NLP (Metrics for evaluating game performance, evaluating player performance, motivation and bias, and evaluating task difficulty);
    • Directive strategies that attempt to use game metrics in real-time.

    The symposium will feature presentations of works-in-progress and best practice from researchers using games and gamification for Natural Language Processing tasks. Workshop presentations will be grouped into themes such as player motivation, game design, using data generated by games and measuring game performance. Key note speakers to be announced soon.

    Location

    Games4NLP will be held in the Las Arenas/El Perellonet rooms (2nd floor) of the Sercotel Sorolla Palace Hotel in Valencia, Spain. Map.

    Program

    1030-1100 Coffee

    1100-1110 Welcome - Massimo Poesio

    1110-1230 Games under development (Session chair: Jon Chamberlain)
    uComp Language Quiz - A Game with a Purpose for Multilingual Language Resource Acquisition (Arno Scharl and Michael Föls)
    Testing game mechanics in games with a purpose for NLP applications (Chris Madge, Udo Kruschwitz, Jon Chamberlain, Richard Bartle and Massimo Poesio)
    Curating an Open Information Extraction Knowledge Base Using Games with a Purpose (Kevin Forand and Philippe Langlais)

    1230-1250 Panel - Challenges of Games for NLP

    1250-1400 Lunch and Demos

    1400-1520 Player motivation (Session chair: Pontus Stenetorp)
    Who wants to play Zombie? A survey of the players on ZOMBILINGO (Karën Fort, Bruno Guillaume and Nicolas Lefebvre)
    Why do we Need Games? Analysis of the Participation on a Crowdsourcing Annotation Platform (Alice Millour and Karën Fort)
    An Exploratory Study of Data Quality and Participation in a Games-for-Science Game Community (Jason Radford and David Lazer)

    1520-1550 Coffee break and Demos

    1550-1710 Game evaluation (Session chair: Massimo Poesio)
    Making NLP games fun to play using Free to Play mechanics: RoboCorp case study (Dagmara Dziedzic and Wojciech Włodarczyk)
    Metrics of games-with-a-purpose for NLP applications (Jon Chamberlain, Richard Bartle, Udo Kruschwitz, Chris Madge and Massimo Poesio)
    Towards a Word Sheriff 2.0: Lessons learnt and the road ahead (Galen Han, Mark Menezes, Leah Halaseh, Jędrzej Stuczyński, Daniele Menara, Sebastian Riedel and Pontus Stenetorp)

    1710-1730 Panel - Future directions for Games for NLP

    1730-1740 Closing comments - Jon Chamberlain

    People

    Co-chairs:

    • Jon Chamberlain (University of Essex, UK)
    • Chris Cieri (Linguistic Data Consortium, University of Pennsylvania, US)
    • Karën Fort (Université Paris-Sorbonne, France)

    Program committee:

    • Richard Bartle (University of Essex, UK)
    • Johan Bos (University of Groningen, Netherlands)
    • Yun-Gyung Cheong (Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea)
    • Eric de la Clergerie (INRIA, France)
    • James Fiumara (Linguistic Data Consortium, University of Pennsylvania, US)
    • Bruno Guillaume (Inria Nancy Grand Est, France)
    • Iryna Gurevych (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
    • Ivan Habernal (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)
    • Frank Hopfgartner (University of Glasgow, UK)
    • Udo Kruschwitz (University of Essex, UK)
    • Michael Meder (TU Berlin, Germany)
    • Mathieu Lafourcade (LIRMM, France)
    • Verena Lyding (EURAC, Italy)
    • Lionel Nicolas (EURAC, Italy)
    • Massimo Poesio (University of Essex, UK)
    • Federico Sangati (Independent researcher, Italy)
    • Pontus Stenetorp (University College London, UK)

    Submission

    The symposium is inviting extended abstract submissions (2 pages maximum, including references) of proposals for talks, demos and posters.

    Submissions must be in PDF, and must conform to the official style guidelines for EACL 2017. Submissions do not need to be anonymised. We ask you to use the EACL-2017 LaTeX template or adapt the Overleaf template for those less familiar with LaTex.

    Accepted submissions will be made available electronically on this website.

    Please email your submission to games4nlp@dali-ambiguity.eu by Monday 27 February 2017.

    • **EXTENDED** Deadline for submissions: Monday 27 February 2017, 11:59pm Hawaii Standard Time
    • **DELAYED** Notification of acceptance: Weds 8 March 2017
    • Final program: 27 March 2017
    • Symposium date: 4 April 2017